Direct TV Dishes and LNB Technology

Direct TV Dishes and LNB Technology

The dish you use for Direct TV will get you a wide variety of channels. When you watch your favorite programs through Direct TV, the dish will automatically determine what frequencies are used for the integrated receiver/decoder (IRD). The Direct TV dish may seem like nothing but a satellite dish; however, unlike the other satellite dishes, it is very small in size. It is either oval or round in shape. The Direct TV dish consists of one to three low noise block converter (LNBs). A Direct TV dish with only one LNB is the one that could receive satellite broadcasts from only one orbiting satellite. A Direct TV dish with two LNBs is capable of catching signals from two various satellites. The recent and most sophisticated dish at the present time is the Direct TV dish with triple LNBs that catches television signals right away from up to three various satellites. Direct TV Dish with Single LNB The Direct TV Dish with only one LNB is designed with the intention that when a satellite beams a signal in the direction of the Direct TV satellite dish it will rebound to that pointing gadget known as an LNB. The more length between the surface of the Earth and the satellite, the wider the area of the circle beam will be. In reality, as a beam travels a longer distance, it loses the power of the signal. In space a signal must go on traveling hypothetically, and that is the reason why we have hindrance in the space. Sunlight plays major role in the cause of this type of interference. However, the important thing to keep in mind is that beams bounce. Direct TV Dish with Double LNB The LNBs exploited in all the Direct TV dish antennas are responsible for receiving the signal that bounces off the dish. The beams coming from a satellite might strike any area of the dish. Whenever the Direct TV dish locates itself inside that broadcasting beam area of the satellite, and positioned in the proper direction, the beam signal will rebound in the approved manner and hit the LNB. However, the satellites settle up in the sky over the equator in an orbit known as geosynchronous orbit. In this case, there are two LNBs in your Direct TV dish with the intention that if there are two satellites directing at an area from different angles, the Direct TV dish will get both beams of the satellite. However, this indicates pointing between the two orbiting satellites in geosynchronous orbit over the equator, one at the side of the other. Direct TV Dish with Triple LNB To receive better signals, you need to get transmissions from two different satellites. Single satellite could not send all the channels in one beam. One beam can digitally get from 12 to 32 various channels. If a beam is more powerful, and then it can send more channels; however, in the case of getting around 250 channels, the beams need to contact other satellites with different transmissions. Consequently a Direct TV dish with triple LNB gets three various satellite beams from three various positions. In this case, every Direct TV satellite is adjacent to the other and your Direct TV dish must face the satellite in the center. Written by David Johnson. Find the latest information on Direct TV

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