Dealing with Water Damage to Your Car

Dealing with Water Damage to Your Car

Water damage to a car can be a real problem. Here are some tips on how to deal with this problem if you are unfortunate enough to have to. There is a big difference between a car and a boat. There was a time when a combination car and boat was developed. You could drive it right up to the lake, and go for a cruise. The idea did not catch on it a very big way. So, now when you car acts like it is a boat and gets involved with a great deal of water, it usually is a bad thing. Water damage to a car can come from many things. Flood damage is one example. Flood damage is usually very serious because it can often involve the car being submerged in the water for a long period of time. Other water damage can result from driving through a flooded area. Although the car does not remain in the water as long, and may not have been as deeply submerged in the water, the damage could still be serious. Water damage could be caused when a car is not properly protected from the outside elements. Body damage, an open hood, or open windows during extended periods of heavy rain or snow can result in body damage. The first area of concern when dealing with water damage is the engine and the transmission fluids. They should be checked with the dipstick. If you observe fluids that appear milky, beige in color, or appear diluted, there is a good chance water is in the pans. In this case, the auto should be towed to a repair facility. If you attempt to drive it with water in the oil or transmission, the damage will quickly become much more serious. If you have any doubts, have it towed. Once the car is in a safe place, the transmission and oil pans can be completely drained, and the fluids replaced. The next area of concern is the brake system. This important system does not react well to being submerged in water either. As soon as possible the brake system should be inspected. Then it should be dried completely, and fluids replaced. Once the car is dry, a complete re-lubrication should be done. The interior of a car will not react well to be submerged either. Although fabric will dry on its own, moisture will seep into the material. It will pool underneath against the firewall and you will have a mildew smell in the car for the remainder of its life. It is the potential problems from water damage to the interior that leads insurance companies to tend to declare flood damaged cars a total loss. It is the best approach to have the interior torn out, completely dried, and replaced by a professional. Ernie Yetis is with AutoBodyShopStop.com - a directory of auto body shops and information.

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